Question 1

Answer: C

For this one you need to read the question carefully, realise that it is a vibration on your steering wheel and then consider the most likely cause. Wheels need "balancing", usually by adding small lead weights to the rim, so that when they spin around at speed they are completely true and don't have any small amount of wobble. Just pop in to any garage and a friendly mechanic will show you. Explain that you're taking your theory test and I'm sure they'll be pleased to help.

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Question 2

Answer: C

If you don't live in a large city then Red Routes will be a mystery to most people, even experienced drivers. This type of route marking is covered in the Highway Code under Rule 215. There are also some diagrams in the Road Markings section. .

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Question 3

Answer: C

Another one of the more technical questions that have appeared in the Theory Test. As the wording implies, the anti-lock system stops the front wheels from locking under harsh braking. Just before the wheels are about to lock (and therefore possibly cause a skid), the brakes are released slightly (enough for them to just turn a fraction) before they are reapplied. This is all done automatically and all the driver may feel through the brake pedal is a slight pulsing. Many modern cars have this fitted as standard now - you may have seen the initials "ABS" (Anti-Lock Braking System) on the back of cars.

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Question 4

Answer: A

One of those facts and figures that you just have to learn. It's the same with stopping distances. They are all in the Highway Code. I have some nice simple ways to help people learn them.

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Question 5

Answer: C

Slowing down will not make it "quite safe" and the Highway Code certainly does not recommend it. Far from it! as Rule 127 states, "Using hands free equipment is also likely to distract your attention from the road."

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Question 6

Answer: A

Drivers not progressing in this situation when the crossing is clear can also cause accidents. Your examiner would expect you to make progress. Rule 172 covers this one.

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Question 7

Answer: A

Whatever type the emergency vehicle may be, you need to work out quickly how it is going to affect you. Where can you go to get out of the way safely? Slow moving vehicles can have amber flashing and hazardous loads have warning signs on them (Rule 258).

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Question 8

Answers: B,D,E

I can't quite see how narrow side streets would have any effect really. I hope that "using busy routes", didn't seem a good option either

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Question 9

Answer: C

Staying close to the carriageway would be a good way of ending up in hospital. With your back to the traffic, you can't react to any thing happening on the motorway. The same applies to behaving like an ostrich. Just a bit of common sense with this one should get you the right answer.

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Question 10

Answer: B

The key to this one is in the question. The word NOT in capitals emphasises that you do not know what is behind you. Using your horn will not help if the pedestrian is deaf and even a small child may not react. The same applies to revving the engine. Reversing slowly merely results in the person just being squashed a bit slower.

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Question 11

Answer: B

The sequence for traffic lights is covered in the Signals section of the Highway Code. Knowing the sequence of lights is vital and should be well covered by your Instructor. One of the best ways to learn is to go for a walk and watch them. The same applies to Pelican and Puffin crossings.

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Question 12

Answers: B,D

A bit of common sense and thought should hopefully sort this one out for you. A vehicle that is carrying too much weight shouldn't find this affecting the gearbox or the battery. The journey time could be affected as it may need to travel slower BUT it is not such a good answer as the other two. The word "seriously" should help guide you.

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Well, hopefully that wasn't too nasty. If you got 10 to 12 of them correct, you might expect to pass a Theory paper. As already mentioned, the actual Theory Tests are for 35 questions and you must score at least 30 marks to pass. Multiplying your score just now by 3 gives a rough guide for you. Remember however that 12 questions taken at random can never cover all the topics that need to be covered.

I always ensure that students take several Mock Tests in order to make quite sure that there are no week areas. Failing a test is never good for your confidence.

This "Theory Test" sample will be changed on a regular basis so that the various topics can be covered. Do not make the mistake of thinking you can rely on your result from a 12-question sample to make up your mind about applying for a Theory Test.